Adventure holidays - Blog - Rip n Rock

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DOES THIS LOOK LIKE FUN OR WHAT?-

We can confirm that it's an absolute scream!!!

This is our new group activity and its available to book now.

 

WHAT IS IT?

Its a stand-up paddle board that floats up to 8 adults or 10 kids. We're calling it our MegaSUP!

If you have a bigger group then no problem, we have plenty of ideas and games that keep everyone engaged even when they're not on the board. 

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HOW LONG IS A SESSION?

About 2 and half hours.

WHAT'S INCLUDED?

1 MASSIVE board!

Wetsuit, Buoyancy Aid, Helmet and paddle for everyone

Structured tuition and full safety briefings from a qualified lifeguard

A laugh a minute

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WHERE DO THE SESSIONS RUN?

We use venues that suit your needs. We can do river and canal trips, flatwater sea sessions or surfing sessions. 

Whatever you want to get from session, whether its pure adrenaline, team building or just trying something new, then we will suggest the best venue for you and your group.

 

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HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?

This depends on the size of your group, prices start from £175

HOW DO I BOOK?

If you've got this far, congratulations, you won't regret it!

E-mail us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  and we'll send you a booking form and all the information you need.

CANT' WAIT TO LAUGH WITH YOU UNTIL OUR SIDES HURT!!

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Published in All Categories

On the 29th July yet another tragic drowning occured at this Gower Beauty spot.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/man-dies-trying-rescue-child-9544706

Three Cliffs Bay is next to be covered on our Gower beach blog but we thought it far more important to re-publish our blog on rip currents before that. 

Whilst we wouldn't like to presume exactly what happened at this incident, its sounds very likely that a rip current was involved.

 The rivermouth at Three Cliffs Bay is a classic example of a rip current. We hope the following information helps you to recognise or escape from one should you be unfortunate enough not to spot it before you get in the water.

A Picture paints a thousand words;

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Signs of rips can be ; Brown water, foam on the surface, debris floating, water surface is different from the rest of the beach (e.g flat when everywhere else has waves, rippled when everywhere else is flat)

So, what is a rip current?

Rip currents are generally caused by water leaving the beach (maybe out from a river, after a big wave or after the tide has pushed the water up and over a sand bank) and its trying to get back to sea level by the easiest way possible i.e the easiest way down the slope, similar to way a river acts. This action of heading back down the slope causes a current in a direction that may not be predicted by the unaware.

The problem is that these slopes on the beach are very subtle and often not visible in the sand by the naked eye but the volume of water that finds their path down them is so great that their effect can be like a river running out to sea. Not many people can swim or paddle their boards against a river/rip current for long without getting exhausted and that's why they are so dangerous.

How do I know if I'm caught in a rip?

Whenever you are in the sea you should keep a constant check on where you are in relation to the beach. If you find that you are paddling or swimming in one direction but not seeming to get anywhere then you may be in a rip current and you need to make a new plan before you don't have any energy left.

What are my options if I'm in a rip current?

As always in an emergency situation, you MUST STAY CALM.

Panic wastes energy, loss of energy leads to poor swimming/paddling technique and not making the right decisions.

Once you understand that you are in a rip current then the following graphic explains your options. 

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 Swim sideways to the current, the strength of the rip current will weaken further from the shore. The vast majority of rip currents will completely dissipate less than 100m from the shore.

The main points are, STAY CALM, don't try to fight against the rip current, take time to reasses, save energy and do something different than swimming/paddling directly against it.

How often do rip currents occur?

Rips can be present permanently or for medium or very short times on any beach. ALWAYS BE AWARE OF YOUR POSITION RELATIVE TO THE SHORE.

What causes a permenant rip?

A river mouth is an example of a permanent rip current. Its got a slope that channels water out to sea! 

Structures such as rock projections, groynes, drainage pipes or piers often have channels to their sides that provide an easy escape route for water off the beach. These structures are easy to spot and so the rip currents should be easy to avoid if you're aware.

How do I spot a short term rip?

Short term rips (Flash Rips) are more likely in stormy, heavy surf with long sets of waves that increase the volume of water above sea level. This, by nature, increases the volume of water that could suddenly flow down a slope on the beach therefore creating a rip.

If you're in the water at the time it happens, you may not be able spot it forming. Sorry to sound like a broken record but......ALWAYS BE AWARE OF YOUR POSITION RELATIVE TO THE SHORE and if you realise that you are not getting to where you are trying to get to then you may be in a rip. Stay calm and swim/paddle sideways to the current.

Where can I get more information?

Coastguard, lifeguards, local surfers, surf schools, outdoor activity companies and many more, if you're not sure then its better to ask. If you still aren't sure then its wise to give it a miss altogether.

The ocean is a wonderful playground that gives us fantastic experiences and we want to encourage everyone to get in there as often as possible. Its a sad fact however that people get killed in it every year as it can be an extremely hazardous environment. 

BE AWARE-STAY SAFE-HAVE FUN

Published in Other
Monday, 27 October 2014 20:00

Rip Currents- Be VERY aware

A serious subject that we feel its our duty to inform you about. On Sunday 27th October 2014 at Mawgan Porth beach in Cornwall three people lost their lives in a rip current (sometimes misleadingly called a riptide). http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2808627/Three-surfers-die-getting-difficulty-water-Cornish-coastal-beauty-spot.html

There are at least 8 definitions of the word 'Rip' in the dictionary but we're only concerned with the definitions that relate to the incident and to us here at RipnRock.

rip 1(raltp)

v. rippedrip·pingrips
v.tr.
1. To cut, tear apart, or tear away roughly : to rip a wave apart with amazing turns on a surfboard

rip 2(raltp)

n.
1. A stretch of water in a river, estuary, or tidal channel made rough by waves meeting an opposing current.
2. A rip current.

So that's the origins of our name cleared up but the second definition doesn't help you to know exactly what a rip current is or, more importantly, how to recognise or escape from one should you be unfortunate enough not to spot it before you get in the water.

A Picture paints a thousand words;

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Signs of rips can be ; Brown water, foam on the surface, debris floating, water surface is different from the rest of the beach (e.g flat when everywhere else has waves, rippled when everywhere else is flat)

 

So, what is a rip current?

Rip currents are generally caused by water leaving the beach (maybe after a big wave or after the tide has pushed the water up and over a sand bank) and its trying to get back to sea level by the easiest way possible i.e the easiest way down the slope, similar to way a river acts. This action of heading back down the slope causes a current in a direction that may not be predicted by the unaware.

The problem is that these slopes on the beach are very subtle and often not visible in the sand by the naked eye but the volume of water that finds their path down them is so great that their effect can be like a river running out to sea. Not many people can swim or paddle their boards against a river/rip current for long without getting exhausted and that's why they are so dangerous.

How do I know if I'm caught in a rip?

Whenever you are in the sea you should keep a constant check on where you are in relation to the beach. If you find that you are paddling or swimming in one direction but not seeming to get anywhere then you may be in a rip current and you need to make a new plan before you don't have any energy left.

What are my options if I'm in a rip current?

As always in an emergency situation, you MUST STAY CALM.

Panic wastes energy, loss of energy leads to poor swimming/paddling technique and not making the right decisions.

Once you understand that you are in a rip current then the following graphic explains your options. Hover over for text.

alt

 Swim sideways to the current, the strength of the rip current often weakens further from the shore.

The main points are, STAY CALM, don't try to fight against the rip current, take time to reasses, save energy and do something different than swimming/paddling directly against it.

How often do rip currents occur?

Rips can be present permanently or for medium or very short times on any beach. ALWAYS BE AWARE OF YOUR POSITION RELATIVE TO THE SHORE.

What causes a permenant rip?

A river mouth is an example of a permanent rip current. Its got a slope that channels water out to sea! 

Structures such as rock projections, groynes, drainage pipes or piers often have channels to their sides that provide an easy escape route for water off the beach. These structures are easy to spot and so the rip currents should be easy to avoid if you're aware.

How do I spot a short term rip?

Short term rips (Flash Rips) are more likely in stormy, heavy surf with long sets of waves that increase the volume of water above sea level. This, by nature, increases the volume of water that could suddenly flow down a slope on the beach therefore creating a rip.

If you're in the water at the time it happens, you may not be able spot it forming. Sorry to sound like a broken record but......ALWAYS BE AWARE OF YOUR POSITION RELATIVE TO THE SHORE and if you realise that you are not getting to where you are trying to get to then you may be in a rip. Stay calm and swim/paddle sideways to the current.

Where can I get more information?

Coastguard, lifeguards, local surfers, surf schools, outdoor activity companies and many more, if you're not sure then its better to ask. If you still aren't sure then its wise to give it a miss altogether.

The ocean is a wonderful playground that gives us fantastic experiences and we want to encourage everyone to get in there as often as possible. Its a sad fact however that people get killed in it every year as it can be an extremely hazardous environment. 

BE AWARE-STAY SAFE-HAVE FUN

Published in Beach & Surfing
Tuesday, 16 September 2014 22:14

Pwlldu Bay - ships, quarries, inns but unspoilt

Whats not to like about this secluded, beautiful bay? With its rich mixture of history, remnants of an industrial past, remote nature and stunning scenery it has to be one of the unsung  jewels of the Gower coast. (If you're here for surfing then go to the end)

The natural harbour and south east aspect makes it one of the safest places to bathe but carrying much more than your swimming cozzie will require some effort as the nearest access is a walk from Pyle Corner in Bishopston (approx 30mins walk). As you walk around the corner on the approach track and get your first glimpse, you'll first be impressed by the lush green of the trees contrasting with the steep grey limestone cliffs quarried more than a century and a half ago. Before long, you'll take in the small, crescent, natural  harbour mirrored by the  expansive half-moon of the bay with its impressive pebble ridge. This ridge holds back the waters that have travelled under and overground through the Bishopston Valley to form PwllDu (the black pool) that gives the beach its name.

There are two houses on the beach which were both once Inns, one for the quarrymen and one for the sailors, necessary at the time as a communal drinking hole would only have resulted in violence!

Nowadays many of us gaze upon these residences and dream of living there or simply wonder about the practicalities of making our home in such isolation. Luckily, for those who have the inclination, you can delve into the residents' way of life and absorb the atmosphere of this wonderful hidden corner of the Gower Peninsula. Ship cottage has a self contained annex for rent http://www.homefromhome.com/cottage-details/652 . You won't find more amiable hosts than Bob and Kath to help you on your way with exploring this less-trodden treasure.

This beach gets waves on a big storm swell, sheltered from SW winds but strong rips and unpredictable banks means its a local secret that you're not likely to catch unless you're "On It" !

Published in Beach & Surfing
Monday, 25 August 2014 09:08

Brandy Cove- witches and stubbed toes

Brandy Cove is situated at the end of a valley that runs down from Bishopston, Swansea.(If you're looking for surfing then go to the end)

It is a quiet and secluded rocky cove with some strips of sand at low tide, twenty minutes walk from Pyle Corner, Bishopston. Alternatively you can walk around the coastal path from Caswell, great care should be taken on this route as the path clings to the edge of steep cliffs. 

Due to its rocky nature, it tends to be more popular with locals escaping the summer crowds or famiies who love exploring caves, scrambling on the rocks and rock-pooling. Many a stubbed toe has been suffered by those brave enough to swim here!

It really distinguishes itself from other Swansea and Gower beaches by its spooky tales. Old Moll, the Witch of the caves who spread illness, pestilance and misfortune everywhere she went. The haunting screams of the murdered Mamie Stuart. The clunks and clicks of rowing brandy smugglers through the sea mist. The history of the Roman lead mines. 

On reflection, maybe the best time to visit Brandy Cove is on a still and moonlit night.....if you dare!!!

(Surfing- Sheltered from SW winds (ish) depending on the tide and sand levels, you may find a surf able wave here on mid-low-mid tide (ish!)  maybe) Big wave surfers will find a wave off the VERY shallow reef west of caswell on the biggest swells. 

Published in Beach & Surfing
Thursday, 24 July 2014 12:52

Caswell Bay

Caswell Bay

 

Caswell Bay is a large sandy beach which is flocked to by surfers all year around! Caswell takes its name from the stream that meanders its way through the Caswell valley and out along the beach! There are some lovely cafe’s just on the brow of Caswell Bay. The beach has lifeguards on between May and September and it is a popular beach for rock-pooling and other sea and beach activities. In 2006 the beach was named in the top 50 beaches in the UK, and as it stands we think that the beach is still pretty special. During low tide and a short walk around the headland to the west you will come onto Brandy Cove - but be sure to keep an eye on the tides.

 
Next Pwll Du Bay..
Published in All Categories

Yesterday we took the Cardiff Lions surfing down Gower on Llangennith Beach!! They were staying down Gower for the weekend camping in a local site and visiting a local rugby team! They were great fun in the sea and many of them were catching waves by the end of the session! The weather was just perfect for it, our hottest day of the year so far (lets hope for many more).

Well done to all the guys who got involved, I hope you enjoyed the day as much as we did.

We welcome all sports teams for great activity days like this! It is a perfect way to get your team working together in a different enviroment all while learning new skills!

If you are interested in a sports team actiivity day with RIPNROCK, just contact us for more information and great prices!

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Published in All Categories
Friday, 11 April 2014 11:34

Easter OFFER!!

It is already Easter, 2014 is flying by! To make your Easter holidays a bit easier we are offering 10% off all bookings. If you are looking for ways to fill your days then we have plenty of activities to fill your days! How about jumping off the rocks/cliffs into the crystal clear blue seas of Gower, Swansea. Or if you'd rather stay dry and have a good head for heights, how about Rock Climbing on the coastal cliffs of Gower? We have the perfect day planned for you. Just get in contact to plan your Easter holiday adventures.

Published in All Categories
Tuesday, 01 April 2014 12:55

What 2014 holds for RIPNROCK?

The beginning of our summer season is here!
We are very much looking forward to meeting lots of new clients and giving them activity experiences to remember. If you are looking to try something new why not book an activity with us?

We offer, Coasteering, Rock Climbing, Canyoning, Surfing, Abseiling, Gorge Walking, Raft Building, Team Building.

You may notice a few new activities in our activity list, we are very excited about being able to offer more to our visiting clients.
New for 2014 we are offering package weekends for stag, hen and groups - you select the activities and accommodation type and we organise the rest for you, all for the best price. If you'd like any more information simply contact us at: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

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Want to enquire about a booking or just have a general question? Then don't be shy, we'd love to hear from you!

Tel: +44 (0) 7815 784122

Email: info@ripnrock.co.uk